Reviews of
Blood Oath of the Cherokee
by Jimmy Cherokee Waters

 

Review on www.Citizen-Times.com:

by Rob Neufeld Posted on Dec. 31, 2008

See the review for the The Read on WNC. at:
http://thereadonwnc.ning.com/forum/topics/blood-oath-by-jimmy-cherokee


Blood Oath by Jimmy Cherokee Waters (Currahee Books trade paperback, 272 pages, $11.95)

“The narrator's friendship with a fellow Vietnam War veteran (fictional), leads to their exploring their heritage in the area of Tugaloo Town (now Toccoa, not far south of Franklin) after his friend's son is killed in a 9/11 firefighting effort. The framework is short--a few pages at the beginning and end--with the bulk of the book being a series of dramatic accounts of should-be-famous Cherokee, settlers, and events (mostly battles). The unflinching nature of the telling (particularly one episode, involving revenge and torture) is noteworthy, even though it makes one wonder about the spirit search and ancestor worship. Most notable is the quality of the narration of the battles. For instance, the King's Mountain battle narration is the most comprehensible I've read. This is an important book--for the emergence of a talented writer; and for the representation of Cherokee glory and governance.’’

 
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Another Review of
Blood Oath of the Cherokee
by Jimmy Cherokee Waters

 

Review for The Historical News

Reviewer:  Forrest W. Schultz for: The Historical News

Forrest W. Schultz is the leader of the Coweta Writers Group and is the author of numerous reviews, articles, essays, and news releases.

Blood Oath by Jimmy Cherokee Waters
(Currahee Books trade paperback, 272 pages, $11.95)
Jimmy Cherokee Waters “Blood Oath”
(Toccoa, GA:  Currahee Books, 2009)  
ISBN: 978-0-615-24394-8

Reviewer:  Forrest W. Schultz for: The Historical News

Jimmy Cherokee Waters is a direct descendant of Runs-To-Water, one of the most important people in the history of the Cherokee Indians.  Runs-To-Water was a good communicator, a fact he learned at a very early age.  Apparently Jimmy has inherited this ability because he has provided us here with a well written and informative history of the Cherokees.  He has succeeded so well because, unlike so many historians, he has included (rather than excluded) interesting things in his account.  Although there are discussions of trends and concepts, most of the material is interesting experiences of the various dramatis personae.

Most Americans, especially Georgians, will find it difficult to read about the infamous Trail of Tears, with which the book concludes.  While this and other examples of inhumane treatment of the Cherokees are presented, the book is not written in a bitter or partisan spirit.  Waters does not flinch from including examples of horrors perpetrated by the Cherokees, such as their blatant violation of the safe conduct promise to the British soldiers in Fort Loudoin in 1760 (p. 81). 

There is so much material included in this account that it is almost impossible to summarize it.  Much of it is similar to other historical accounts of Indians, which describe their clothing, customs, hunting, wars, and their views of nature and man and God.  Readers who like tales of Indian lore will enjoy this book. And it will be edifying to all Americans, especially Georgians, who believe in continuing their education.

Among the many other things noted is the fact that the slang term "kicking ass" was already in use in 1780 (see p. 93), that the famous "rebel yell" of the Confederate soldiers was derived from the battle cry of the Cherokee warriors (p. 125), that the game "King of the Mountain" comes from the Revolutionary War's Battle of King's Mountain in 1780 (p. 115), and that the famous "Footprints" poem was composed and first recited by Reverend Richard Cleveland in the eulogy he delivered for his father Reverend John Cleveland, who was a missionary to the Cherokee and the founder of the Tugaloo Baptist Church (pp. 222-224).  And to Titanic fans, it is interesting to note that the hubris of the "unsinkable by God" boast was not unprecedented -- the notorious Tory General Patrick Ferguson in regard to the aforementioned battle had the gall to announce that he was the King of the Mountain and that not even God could drive him from it (p. 115)!  And we cannot omit mention of the legend of the Cherokee Rose, which has similarities to the legend of the flower of the Dogwood tree (p. 263f). 

Waters' book reads like a good novel and it even has a title appropriate for a good suspense story.  This title was not contrived but refers to an actual Cherokee custom, The Blood Oath, which is very important in the history of the Cherokee, as the book abundantly demonstrates. Although most of what we read here is historical fact, there is some fictional material included and the interpretations are those of the author. Since it is primarily a historical account, it can be misleading to regard it as historical fiction because all of the main "characters" are real people who did most of the things attributed to them here.   

     
Forrest W. Schultz is the leader of the Coweta Writers Group and is the author of numerous reviews, articles, essays, and news releases. 

 
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Readers Reviews of
Blood Oath of the Cherokee
by Jimmy Cherokee Waters

 

Posted on Amazon.com: (downloaded on 9/20/2010

This review is from: CARL P. DANN

Blood Oath
(Perfect Paperback)

Its hard to describe what a fantastic job Jimmy Waters has done in taking the reader from his comfortable 21st century lifestyle and throwing him feet-first into a world of life and death lived along a razor's edge. The intertwining of lives and personalities, both famous and lost to history, and the rich development of the scenery, sounds and smells of 18th century America is magical. The depth of research and Waters' natural story-telling genius combine in this work of art that is nothing short of perfect. Having lived for two decades in the very shadow of all the places and landmarks that the story weaves around, I am especially shaken to my core in realization of what was gained and what was lost in terms of people, families, states and nations on the beautiful blood-fed ground of the southern Blue Ridge Mountains. After reading Waters' book "Blood Oath," I will tread more carefully, more reverently upon this blessed ground.



Joe S. Webster "Lifelong student" (Middle Tennessee) –

Blood Oath
(Perfect Paperback)

Well written, engaging account of a region and the people who transformed it. This is a good overview of the history of the Blue Ridge area of the eastern US. It paints a vivid picture of the people and events of the 1700-1800's and how this region developed and ultimately shaped US history. Also it chronicles a man's search for roots and family. Highly recommended!

This review is from: D. LANIER

Blood Oath
(Perfect Paperback)

Just finished reading this wonderful book! A historical fiction in which the writer creates a deep feeling and understanding of the lives of his ancestors! Lots of facts in this book regarding the Cherokee and what happened during their history when the white settlers came and took their land which eventually led to the Trail of tears. Loved it!! Congrats to the author...you did a wonderful job.. Very heartfelt! I look at history a little different now. Thanks.

 
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Publisher: William Bender 766 Collins St., Toccoa, GA 30577 800 991-1114